Fire Service Asks People To Dispose Of Their Christmas Trees Correctly!

If you are lucky enough to own a house with a wood burner, then chances are that you might decide to get rid of your Christmas tree by sending up in smoke.

The smell of fir trees burning will no-doubt fill the air over the coming days as millions of once-adorned trees are consigned to wood burners and fire-pits all around the country.

However, one Fire Service has requested that people dispose of their trees correctly after having to deal with a string of false alarms which have been initiated after plumes of white smoke have been seen emanating out of peoples chimneys.

A tweet shared on the Alton Fire Station (@AltonFire05) said:

“21:15 H05P7 mobilised to another chimney fire in Fourmarks.

“The occupant was burning their Christmas Tree. Please ensure you dispose of them correctly.

“It did allow us to test the Chimney Fire Stop again which proved an effective tool initially”.

Greenpeace have the following advice in relation to how best to dispose of your Christmas tree:

1. Re-plant it in a pot

Many Christmas trees, like Norwegian Spruce and Fraser Fir, are surprisingly resilient. And it turns out that, even if the branches on yours are starting to droop, trees can recover if they’re planted in a pot of soil and left outside for nature to take course.

As Aimee, a Greenpeace supporter, explained on Facebook: “My parents stuck theirs in a pot of soil last year as an experiment and because they enjoy watching the birds playing in it. However, it somehow managed to root itself and start growing again. They used it again this year and plan on continuing the tradition for as long as possible.”

2. Arrange for a charity to collect it

Lots of Greenpeace members got in touch to say they plan to arrange for a local charity to collect their tree in return for a small donation. There are charity collection schemes operating throughout the UK – visit charityxmastreecollection.com to find one near you. Or you can search on Google for “Charity Christmas tree collection [name of your town]” to see what comes up.

Thanks to Sharon, Sophie and Julian who made this suggestion over on the Greenpeace UK Facebook page.

3. Drop it at your local garden centre

Some garden centres collect old trees, chip them, and then re-use the chippings throughout the rest of the year. So if you know a garden centre near your home, it’s worth giving them a call to see if they’ll give your old tree a new home.

4. Donate your old tree to a conservation scheme

In some parts of the UK, old Christmas trees are used in important conservation work. In Formby, Merseyside, trees are used to protect sand dunes and sea defences. And in Calderdale, West Yorkshire, they’re used to build up hedgerows and safety barriers around Ogden reservoir.

It’s best to contact your local council for more info about schemes in your area.

5. Leave it with your garden waste collection

In some parts of the UK, Christmas trees are collected with garden waste – meaning all you have to do is leave the tree outside your front door and the council will pick it up for local composting or chipping. But please note that not all council offer this service, so it’s best to check with yours first.

Image / featured image credit: @AltonFire05 | Twitter

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